PROVING THE PARENTAGE OF DAVID ALSIP

PROVING THE PARENTAGE OF DAVID ALSIP

Genealogical Proof Standard-1

 

Proving the Parentage of  David Alsip

The names of the children of James ALSIP and Ann STEWART seem to have been handed down through the years in family records, which were very likely written down in a family Bible at one time. This Bible or more likely several Bibles seem to have been lost or destroyed over the generations.  Most family records seem to agree that the known children of James and Ann are: Alexander, James, Jr.; Nancy Jane; Elijah Stewart; David; Richard Henry; Mary W.; Anny Stacy; and Nelson[1].
Although specific original documentation proving the parentage of David ALSIP to be James ALSIP and Ann STEWART has not yet been uncovered, there is much circumstantial evidence that supports that father-son connection between David and James.  In collecting and reviewing this evidence, this relationship may be supported by census records, tax records, land deeds, and naming patterns.
To begin with, early census records track the movement of the households of James ALSIP and his children as they begin to establish households of their own in the counties of Knox, Whitley, Pulaski, and Hancock in the state of Kentucky.
On the 1810 federal census for Knox County, Kentucky[2], the household of James ALSIP enumerated the following persons: three males under the age of 10, one male in the 26 thru 44 age group, one male age 45 and older, one female under age 10, one female in the 16 thru 25 age group, and one female age 45 and older.  The older male and female in the age 45 and older group are most likely the parents of James ALSIP, namely John ALSIP and Jurya (Potter) ALSIP.
On the 1820 federal census for Knox County, Kentucky[3], the household of James ALSUP [sic] enumerated the following persons: two males under the age of 10, two males age 10 and under 16, one male age 26 and under 45, one female under age 10, and one female age 26 and under 45.  The children on this census record are most likely Alexander, James, Jr., Elijah Stewart, David, and Nancy Jane.
On the 1830 federal census[4], James and family have moved to Pulaski County, Kentucky. In the household of James ALSOP, the following persons are enumerated: one male under the age of 5, two males age 10 and under 15, one male age 15 and under 20, two males age 20 and under 30, one male age 40 and under 50, three females under age 5, one female age 10 and under 15, one female age 15 and under 20, and one female age 40 and under 50.  The young males are most likely Alexander, James, Jr., Elijah Stewart, David, Richard Henry, and Nelson.  Three of the young females are most likely Nancy Jane. Mary W., and Anny Stacy.  A young female under age 5 and the female age 10 and under 15 are as yet unidentified members of the household.  They could be children who did not survive (and whose deaths were not recorded in family records) or visiting relatives or “foster” children.
Nearby, six households below James, is the household of a Daniel Richardson[5].  Daniel is believed to be the father of the two RICHARDSON sisters, Temprance “Tempy” and Rachel, who marry two ALSIP brothers, Elijah Stewart and David.  Daniel’s household enumerated the following persons: two males under age 5, one male age 15 and under 20, one male age 30 and under 40, one female age 5 and under 10, one female age 10 and under 15, and one female age 30 and under 40.  The two young females are most likely Tempy and her younger sister Rachel.
On the 1840 federal census, David[6] and his brother Elijah[7] have established households of their own in Pulaski County.  Their father and siblings have moved to Whitley County, Kentucky.  David’s household enumerates the following persons:  one male under age 5, one male age 20-30, one female under age 5, and one female age 15-20.  The young female is most likely David’s daughter Sophia and the older female his wife Rachel.  The young male is probably his son James D.  Elijah’s household has one male age 20-30, one female age 10-15, and one female age 20-30.  The younger female could be a sister who remained in his care.  The older female is most likely his wife Tempy.  Tempy and Elijah never had any known children.  In his will[8], Elijah gives everything to his wife Tempy and does not mention any children at all.
The households of David and Elijah are found side by side on the census record.  Just above Elijah’s household is the household of Daniel Richardson[9].  Daniel’s household enumerates the following persons: two males age 10-15, one male age 40-50, and one female age 30-40.  The two young females from the 1830 census are no longer in Daniel’s household on the 1840 census.  This lends support to the two sisters marrying the two ALSIP brothers, as does, the close proximity of the three households.
On the 1840 federal census, James is found in Whitley County, Kentucky[10].  James’s household enumerates the following persons: one male age 5-10, one male age 15-20, one male age 50-60, one female age 5-10, and one female age 10-15.  The older female on the 1830 census in Pulaski is not enumerated on this 1840 census in Whitley.  Most likely,  Ann, the older female, died sometime between 1830 and 1840.  The two young males are probably Nelson and Richard Henry and the two females are most likely Mary W. and Anny Stacy.
James, Jr.[11] and Alexander[12] now have households of their own in Whitley County, Kentucky moving to that area with their father.  They are the only persons enumerated in their households.  James, Jr. is enumerated in the age 20-30 group.  Alexander is enumerated in the age 30-40 group.
Tax records in Pulaski County, Kentucky show that James ALSUP first appears as a taxpayer in 1829.  In 1831, James ALSUP, Jr. and Alex ALSUP are listed as taxpayers. In 1833, James, Sr., James, Jr. and Alexander are listed as taxpayers.  David and Elijah ALLSUP appear for the first time in the tax records in 1834.  In 1837, James ALSUP and Elijah ALSUP are on the tax lists.  In 1839, David ALLSUP, James Sr., James Jr. and Elijah are on the tax lists.  In 1840, David ALSUP and James ALLSUP, Sr. appear on the tax list.  In 1841, 1843, and 1844 both David and Elijah are on the tax lists. [13]
James Alsip, Sr. does not appear on the 1850 federal census.  Marriage records from Pulaski County, Kentucky indicate that James died prior to 2 February 1846 when daughter Mary W. married James W. Tucker.  Her brother, Elijah gives consent for the marriage of his sister.  The marriage record states: “Surety, bro. Of bride, [Elijah S. Allsup] made oath their parents are dead and his sister lives with him and considers him her guardian, he consents.”[14]
Elijah also gives consent for the youngest sister, Anny Stacy, to be married two years later.  The marriage record for John Roberts and Anny Stacy Alsip states: “E. S. Alsip gives consent, ‘I have raised the girl, her parents being dead.’”[15]  Elijah seems to be the big brother to his siblings as in 1860, David’s son William W. Scott Alsip is living with his uncle Elijah and aunt Tempy in Hancock County, Kentucky.[16]
On the 1850 federal census, David has moved his family to Greene County, Missouri. The family story is that David and his family moved west in search of “gold”.  It was in Missouri that his son William W. Scott Alsip was born and his wife Rachel died shortly after William’s birth, probably from childbirth complications.  Faced with the care of a newborn, David quickly married for a second time.  His new bride was Elizabeth Hall.[17]
This 1850 federal census lists David as age 31 and born in Kentucky.[18]  William W. Scott Alsip is the last child listed on this census.
Land records indicate that Elijah and David received land grants for land in Pulaski County.  Their father James, and brother Alexander bought land in Pulaski County in 1838.  Elijah buys additional land in 1848.
James sells his land in 1840 probably to move to Whitley County where he is enumerated on the 1840 census. His son Alexander sold his land the year before (1839).  Later, David sells his land in 1846 probably to head west in search of gold. Then in 1849, Elijah and Tempy sell their land and soon moved to Hancock County, Kentucky.
Sometime after 1850, David relocates his family and moves to Hancock County near his brother Elijah.  The second wife died and David marries for a third time in 1858 in Hancock County, Kentucky.[19]  David begins appearing on the tax records in Hancock County in 1859 and stays on the tax lists at least through 1864.  David and his second family with his third wife do not appear on the 1860 census record in Hancock County, although he is certainly paying taxes in that county.  During this time period,  his son William W. Scott ALSIP does appear on the 1860 census in the household of  his uncle Elijah and aunt Tempy.
Reasons for William to be with his aunt and uncle could be that he was needed to help on the farm.  Elijah dies in 1863 and may not have been in good health at the time of the census. He would need help on the farm since he had no children of his own. Another reason is that David was starting a second family and William may have felt uncomfortable with the young half-brothers.  Wiliam’s older brothers and sisters had households of their own.  It seems natural that David’s son would turn to his uncle and aunt at that time as Elijah often seemed to be regarded as a father figure by his siblings after the death of his father.  Williams remains with his aunt and is on the 1870 census with her and her second husband.[20]  William is even married at her residence.[21]
In addition to the census records, the tax records, and the land records, the naming pattern suggests that these ALSIPs are a family unit.  David names two of his daughters after his sisters (Nancy and Mary).  He names the oldest James after his father and another son after his brother Alexander.  William continues to reuse those names by naming two of his daughters Nancy and Mary.  He names a son after his uncle Elijah Stewart.  David’s brother, Alexander names one of his sons after David.
Although none of these records specifically state that David is the son of James ALSIP and Ann STEWART, they certainly to lend support to that relationship.  The close proximity on the 1840 census for David and Elijah suggests that they could be siblings. The tax records in Pulaski County lists James, Alexander, Elijah, and David as taxpayers in the same county.
Census records indicate the family moved as a unit from county to county.  When James moved to Whitley County, his sons Alexander and James, Jr. moved with him, as shown by the 1840 census.  The two ALSIP brothers, David and Elijah, who married the two RICHARDSON sisters, Tempy and Rachel, stayed in Pulaski County in 1840 living next to their father-in-law, Daniel RICHARDSON.
For a short time, David strikes out on his own when he moves to Missouri as shown on the 1850 census.  After the birth of his son William W. Scott ALSIP and the death of his wife Rachel, he marries his second wife Elizabeth.  After his second wife Elizabeth died, he married a third time to a Catherine ROGERS in Hancock County.  When exactly he moves to Hancock County, Kentucky where his brother Elijah is living is not known. However, his third marriage occurs in Hancock County in 1858 and he first appears on the tax lists in Hancock County in 1859.
A search for the will and/or probate records of James ALSIP in Whitley County, Kentucky yielded no surviving records as most of  those early records for that time period were destroyed in a fire.  A search of will and probate records in Knox and Pulaski Counties did not uncover any records of that nature for James ALSIP.  Attempts to find and obtain copies of family Bible records were also unsuccessful.


[1] Jerry David Alsup, B. S. M. A., complier. ALSOP’S TABLES: (ALSOP, ALSUP, ALSIP. ALLSOP, ALSEP, ALLSUP, ALSOPP, ALSEPT, ETC.), Volume II.  published by The Alsup Press; 1994. pp. 403-404.
[2] 1810 U. S. Federal Census, Barbourville, Knox County, Kentucky, M252_7, p. 94, hh of James Alsop.
[3] 1820 U. S. Federal Census, N W side of Cumberland River, Knox County, Kentucky, M33_23, p. 165, hh of James Alsup.
[4] 1830 U. S. Federal Census, Pulaski County, Kentucky, M19_4, p. 26, hh of James Alsop.
[5] 1830 U. S. Federal Census, Pulaski County, Kentucky, M19_41, p. 26, hh of Daniel Richardson.
[6] 1840 U. S. Federal Census, Pulaski City, Pulaski County, Kentucky, M704_122, p. 327, hh of David Alsop.
[7] 1840 U. S. Federal Census, Pulaski City, Pulaski County, Kentucky, M704_122, p. 327, hh of Elijah Alsop.
[8] Will of Elijah Alsip
[9] 1840 U. S. Census, Pulaski City, Pulaski County, Kentucky, M704_122, p. 327, hh of Daniel Richardson.
[10] 1840 U. S. Federal Census, Whitley County, Kentucky, M704_126, p. 207, hh of James Alsip.
[11] 1840 U. S. Federal Census, Whitley County, Kentucky, M704_126, p. 207, hh of James Alsip, Jr.
[12] 1840 U. S. Federal Census, Whitley County, Kentucky, M704_126, p. 207, hh of A. Alsup.
[13] Tax Lists of Pulaski County, Kentucky, 1829- 1844
[14] Marriage record of James W. Tucker and Mary W. Allsup [sic], 2 February 1846, Pulaski County, Kentucky Marriage Bonds, 1799-1863.
[15] Marriage record of John Roberts and Anny Stacy Alsip, 11 February 1848, Pulaski County, Kentucky Marriage Bonds, 1799-1863.
[16] 1860 U. S. Federal Census, Hancock County, Kentucky,
[17] Marriage record of David Alsip and Elizabeth Hall, Greene County Missouri
[18] 1850 U. S. Federal Census, Porter Township, Greene County, Missouri, M432_400, p. 300B, hh of David Alsup.
[19] Marriage record of David Alsip and Catherine Rogers, Hancock County, Kentucky
[20] 1870 U.S. Federal census, Hancock County, Kentucky,
[21] Marriage record of William Alsip and Elizabeth Kennedy, 24 June 1872, Hancock County, Kentucky.

Recent Posts